Kremlin’s prisoner Ukrainian Shumkov injected with unknown substance. After which he began mentioning mental issues in letters. | QHA media
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Kremlin’s prisoner Ukrainian Shumkov injected with unknown substance. After which he began mentioning mental issues in letters.

18 November 2019, 17:51
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Kremlin political prisoner Oleksandr Shumkov, who is kept in correctional colony No. 4 in Torzhok (Russia), could have been injected with psychotropic substances.

His friends and relatives told journalist about his state.

According to Oleksandr’s aunt Lyudmila Shumkova, on October 14, ther political prisoner went on a hunger strike, and on November 22 he was transferred to a hospital in Torzhok.

“After some time, thanks to the lawyer who visited him, it became known that Oleksandr was injected with unknown substances. So, when they enter the ward, they already have filled syringes with an unknown substance that is injected into him, without explaining what it could be,” Shumkova said.

According to her, Shumkov’s lawyer tried to meet with a doctor to find out what exactly he was “treated” with, but the head of this medical institution said that the doctor was out, and he himself could not explain what treatment was prescribed.

She went on saying that after carrying out such “treatment”, Oleksandr’s state of health did not improve.

“Prior to this, Oleksandr complained of constant headaches associated with the concussion that he received during his stay in the east of our state (Donbas in Ukraine – Ed.) during the hostilities. These headaches can occur spontaneously. They are torturing him now. Moreover, he has back pain. And also he is now troubled by cramps and constant sudden changes in moods which were not typical for him,” Shumkova emphasized.

According to Oleksandr’s relatives, one can suspect the use of some kind of psychotropic substances.

Shumkov’s lawyer, Aleksei Baranovsky, said that the colony in which Oleksandr is kept is considered “very specific,” and this fact is known among human rights defenders. Therefore, he was not surprised by the information that psychotropic substances could have been injected to a prisoner.

“But thanks to the fact that Alexander is visited every week, they write to him, they don’t forget about him, at least the possibility of physical pressure and beatings is excluded – because this will be immediately noticed,” – Baranovsky summed up.

According to Katerina Petrenko, activist of the #SaveOlegSentsov global campaign, in his last letter dated November 7, Oleksandr Shumkov said that on that day he was transferred from the hospital back to correctional colony No.4. The prisoner also said that his roommate had been infected with hepatitis B during a previous hospital stay.

Petrenko showed several letters from Shumkov and emphasized that in his last letter he wrote that there was no reason to hope for an exchange.

Photo: facebook Katerina Petrenko

“There is another year ahead, God forbid I go insane, the first signs are already being felt,” the activist quoted a few lines from Shumkov’s letter.

Petrenko said that from these letters one can notice how much the psychological condition of Shumkov has changed – especially if this letter is compared with the previous one, which he wrote before getting to the hospital and receiving unknown injections.

Then believed that he would stay alive and get out of prison, and the only question was when this would happen. In that letter, Shumkov wrote that he knew for sure that many people in Ukraine needed him and that many were waiting for him.

The activist called for supporting Shumkov and other political prisoners with letters, as this is the only sure way to protect them.

Since October 14, Shumkov has been starving – he demanded to no longer use the captives to put pressure on Ukraine, and also asked for a medical examination because of his poor health. Moreover, Oleksandr, on his hunger strike, saught to ensure that the Russian Ombudsperson Tatyana Moskalkova answered his requests on violation of rights in a pre-trial detention center. But in early November, Shumkov was forced to end a hunger strike with threats.