Gorlovka residents still living in local school’s basement

For more than a year, residents of the Ukrainian village of Gorlovka, currently occupied by pro-Russian terrorists, have been living in a local school’s basement after having their houses destroyed in the hostilities.

15 October 2015 14:51

The International Committee of the Red Cross is continuing its operation in the occupied areas of the Lugansk and Donetsk regions by constantly supplying relief aid to the residents of the towns and villages located near the front line. The organization’s representatives claim the situation in the area is teetering on the brink of a humanitarian disaster. In Gorlovka, for example, local residents have been forced to live in a local school’s basement for more than a year.

The International Committee of the Red Cross’s representatives also say disruptions in power supply and checkpoints established by the warring sides are making the lives of Donbass residents who chose to stay in their homes, and particularly elderly people, a lot more difficult.

The situation in villages like Kominternovo, which are located in the so-called ‘grey zone’, remains very hard, with their residents having to risk their lives travelling to remote locations in areas controlled by either of the warring sides to be able to get relief aid.

The International Committee of the Red Cross makes a special issue of the problems experienced by elderly people who have been rendered helpless due to the ongoing armed conflict.  Elderly people need help with such basic things as bringing a bucket of water, fixing their houses or getting medical attention.

IRIS news agency earlier reported that the local residents may face problems after cold weather hits because the region’s infrastructure was completely destroyed and offices of all major international organizations forced to close by pro-Russian terrorists. Apart from lack of heating, residents of the Lugansk and Donetsk regions are experiencing acute shortage of medications helping prevent an outbreak of potentially epidemic diseases.